Pippa Greenwood’s barrel greenhouse

Pippa Greenwood's barrel greenhouse
Hampshire

I went on a photoshoot at Pippa Greenwood’s place last week. It was mind-numbingly cold with a biting wind but Pippa was very jolly and fed us cupcakes and pizza.

I totally fell for her barrel greenhouse. It’s made by a Scottish company, Carrick Cooperage. It would be perfect for a small town garden, or even a balcony. I was very tempted to sit in it, out of the wind, leaving Pippa and Paul the photographer to get on with it, but I soldiered bravely on.

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John’s window boxes (again)

Violas, cyclamen and dogwood stems in a window box
St John’s Wood

I featured John’s window boxes last summer when they were filled with orange geraniums and coleus. Here’s his winter version. The cyclamen and violas are pretty, but it’s the pale green dogwood stems that really make the whole thing special.

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Guess the shop…

Raised beds containing evergreens outside Tillie's Nail Bar
Warwick Avenue

This classy, rustic looking planter planted with tasteful wintry evergreens instantly caught my eye. I was intrigued to see what type of emporium it was standing outside. A cafe, or kitchen shop, maybe?

Actually, it’s a nail bar and beauty salon. It’s called Tillie’s and a quick Google has revealed that it’s a favourite of Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar (and local yummy mummies).

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Winter pots

 

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I stopped by to see Andrea Brunsendorf, head gardener at the Inner Temple Garden the other day. Her display of pots is amazing in spring and summer, and in winter she keeps the display going with evergreens. Any pots that are filled with bare earth or planted with bulbs are covered with pieces of conifer. Andrea says this is common practice in Germany – it’s too cold for many types of winter bedding, so the conifer pieces make pots and window boxes look more attractive in the chillier months.

Andrea says that the conifer cover has the added advantage of keeping the Inner Temple’s cat out of the pots. It doesn’t fool squirrels, though…